Contents Pages & Indexing

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To help with reviewing and/or organising your journal at a later date you might want to consider leaving a few blank pages at the beginning of your journal for the purpose of writing a contents page or index.

index -journal

Indexing the contents of your journal, allows you to write freely in your journal but still be able to review and find what you are looking for quickly.

The most straightforward way to index your contents is to simple list your topics and page numbers. As you fill up your journal simply add your topics and page numbers to the index. As you can see from the example pictured above where topics or categories recur you can list the page numbers.

Depending on how detailed you want your index to be, you might also want to use sub-topics.

The index should be created on the first blank page of your Bullet Journal.

Indexing your content provides you the flexibility to organically fill your Bullet Journal, while still being able to quickly find what you’re looking for. It lists your topics and their page numbers.

As you start filling your Bullet Journal, simply add your topics and their page numbers to the index. Topics that span a series of consecutive spreads are indexed like this 5-10. Some topics however are recurring and can be spread throughout your Bullet Journal. These topics can be indexed like this: Topic Name: 5-10, 23, 34-39 etc.

If you have a very complex or multi-faceted topic, you may want to use sub-topics. Subtopics will allow you to quickly reference a specific part of a larger topic. Let’s take planning a big vacation. Over the course of a couple months, you have five spreads dedicated to planning this trip. Those spreads will most likely not be consecutive. Each spread will probably contain entries that are specific parts of that trip like: hotels, flights, excursions, etc.By using subtopics, you’ll be able to look up exactly what you’re looking for much more quickly in your index

– See more at: http://www.bulletjournal.com/#sthash.OUNbRppW.dpuf

The index should be created on the first blank page of your Bullet Journal.

Indexing your content provides you the flexibility to organically fill your Bullet Journal, while still being able to quickly find what you’re looking for. It lists your topics and their page numbers.

As you start filling your Bullet Journal, simply add your topics and their page numbers to the index. Topics that span a series of consecutive spreads are indexed like this 5-10. Some topics however are recurring and can be spread throughout your Bullet Journal. These topics can be indexed like this: Topic Name: 5-10, 23, 34-39 etc.

If you have a very complex or multi-faceted topic, you may want to use sub-topics. Subtopics will allow you to quickly reference a specific part of a larger topic. Let’s take planning a big vacation. Over the course of a couple months, you have five spreads dedicated to planning this trip. Those spreads will most likely not be consecutive. Each spread will probably contain entries that are specific parts of that trip like: hotels, flights, excursions, etc.By using subtopics, you’ll be able to look up exactly what you’re looking for much more quickly in your index

– See more at: http://www.bulletjournal.com/#sthash.OUNbRppW.dpuf

The index should be created on the first blank page of your Bullet Journal.

Indexing your content provides you the flexibility to organically fill your Bullet Journal, while still being able to quickly find what you’re looking for. It lists your topics and their page numbers.

As you start filling your Bullet Journal, simply add your topics and their page numbers to the index. Topics that span a series of consecutive spreads are indexed like this 5-10. Some topics however are recurring and can be spread throughout your Bullet Journal. These topics can be indexed like this: Topic Name: 5-10, 23, 34-39 etc.

If you have a very complex or multi-faceted topic, you may want to use sub-topics. Subtopics will allow you to quickly reference a specific part of a larger topic. Let’s take planning a big vacation. Over the course of a couple months, you have five spreads dedicated to planning this trip. Those spreads will most likely not be consecutive. Each spread will probably contain entries that are specific parts of that trip like: hotels, flights, excursions, etc.By using subtopics, you’ll be able to look up exactly what you’re looking for much more quickly in your index

– See more at: http://www.bulletjournal.com/#sthash.OUNbRppW.dpuf

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